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Sesame almond butter cookies [refined sugar, dairy, gluten, egg and flour free]

Sesame almond butter cookies on a baking sheet.

Do you sometimes long for those moments on quiet afternoons where you get to sit down with your cup of tea, a small delicious biscuit and a magazine, and lazily flip through the pages while enjoying a break? No “mummy, mummy, mummy, mummy” requests, no neverending list of tasks running through your end, just ultimate relaxation and refresh. I do. Often. (And I don’t even drink tea!) And you know what, even if you can’t quite make those moments a reality (every day or ever), these sesame almond butter cookies will help. I promise.

Sesame almond butter cookies on a baking sheet.

Sesame almond butter cookies – great for most diets

These cookies are fabulous. They are basically mostly made of nuts (almonds, to be precise), with some added sesame seeds, sweetened by maple syrup and flavoured with a pinch of salt, some vanilla and almond extract (which lends it an intriguing smell and taste).

In other words, there is no egg, no flour, therefore no wheat or gluten, no dairy and no refined sugar in these gorgeous cookies – which makes them suitable for most diets and sensational with that cup of tea (or for bribing your kids to leave you in peace for 5 minutes, just sayin’).

Unfortunately, as they have quite a lot of nuts in them (both in the almond meal and in the almond butter), they are not nut free and, therefore, not suitable for most school lunchboxes.

Stacking sesame almond butter cookies on a cake stand.

How these cookies come together – stop motion video/gif

I was recently involved in a great collaboration on Instagram where we got to practice our stop motion/gif making skills. I honestly love these collabs so much – even though I always feel I don’t have enough time, somehow even in the midst of a crazy timetable of work, kids, school and all the other adulting we have to do, I end up learning something new and connecting with my fellow (super talented) foodies and food photographers over that topic. And that’s something that really makes me happy, inspired and energised.

If you haven’t heard of stop motion, it basically involves taking a bunch of photos of the same subject/frame, with one or more elements moving in each shot and then stitching them together in an app or on your PC and playing them like a video, to create a perception of movement in an otherwise still frame.

Some of the collab participants created a gif of ingredients moving around to create a meal, or being chopped, some showed liquid filling up glasses or bowls, some of the gifs involved candles being lit and extinguished, some were of cakes being stacked and iced as if magically all by themselves, yet others showed icing dripping down a gorgeous cake or pasta being made step by step.

The world is your oyster with this technique – all you need is your imagination and a steady hand or a camera stand/mount, to make sure you are able to capture multiple photos of the same frame.

The video below is an example – this is my first stop motion which shows the mixing of the cookie batter and the stacking of the cookies onto the baking sheet. You will see that there is a bit of movement in the gif/video, because this was my first attempt and I didn’t use a stand.

Stacking cookies – what fun!

This is another stop motion video I created for the collab and the one I actually ended up posting. You will see the frame doesn’t jump around as much in this one – this is because, even though I didn’t use a stand for this one either (I know, I should really listen to my own advice more), I had two little helpers. So, I was able to hold the camera steady the whole time, with the twins stacking the cookies for me.

I made sure to take a photo of the empty stand first, and then each step as the pyramid was built, as well as the final cookie structure. Then, I stitched them with an app on my phone (I used Gif Maker by Momento but there are others) and voila! Done. So easy and we all loved the (family bonding) activity as well as the result (and no one needs to know we were tasting the cookies as we went).

Now I want to experiment with stop motion more – and it doesn’t need to be food related (try creating one of your child making faces, for example, it’s hilarious)! Have you created stop motion videos before and, if so, what’s your favourite subject? If not, are you inspired to give these a go?

More nut butter (and more healthy cookies)

If you follow my blog (or my Instagram account), you may have noticed I have been obsessed with nut butter as well as cookies. Yep, I can’t stop snacking but I guess at least I make sure whatever I eat is nutritious and low in sugar. Just like these sesame almond butter cookies.

So whether or not you drink tea, try some of these today! They are nutty, crunchy, crumbly, almondy, and just all over delicious and I promise you won’t be disappointed.

Sesame almond butter cookies on a baking sheet.

Recipe

Sesame almond butter cookies on a baking sheet.
Print Pin
5 from 17 votes

Sesame almond butter cookies [refined sugar, dairy, gluten, egg and flour free]

Author Katerina | Once a Foodie

Ingredients

  • 200 g almond meal
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • pinch salt flakes
  • 6 tbsp almond butter (lookout for those made with 100% almonds and no added sugar)
  • 4 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla paste
  • 1 tsp almond extract (try to find no alcohol extract)

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180C and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  • Mix all ingredients together until well blended.
  • Using an ice cream scoop, scoop about a tablespoon worth of the mixture into your hands, roll it into a ball, then place onto the lined baking sheet, squeezing lightly down with your fingers to flatten the top.
  • Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly brown. Let cook before enjoying!

Notes

This recipe yields about 20 – 24 cookies, depending on how big you make them. One baking sheet should be enough as they don’t really expand.
 
This recipe has been inspired by a recipe for tahini biscuits from Niki Webster’s gorgeous cookbook Rebel Recipes.
 
You have found this delightful recipe on Once a Foodie – onceafoodie.com. It was lovely to see you. Please come visit again.
 
(c) 2020 – copyright Once a Foodie. All rights reserved.
Stacking sesame almond butter cookies on a cake stand.

Recipe notes

This recipe yields about 20 – 24 cookies, depending on how big you make them.

One baking sheet should be enough as they don’t really expand. 

This recipe has been inspired by a recipe for tahini biscuits from Niki Webster’s gorgeous cookbook Rebel Recipes.

Sesame almond butter cookies on a baking sheet.

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